Menopause Signs It's Better to Know About While You're Young

Menopause is a stage in life when a woman stops having her monthly period. It is a normal part of aging and marks the end of a woman's reproductive years.

Menopause typically occurs in a woman's late 40s to early 50s. However, women who have their ovaries surgically removed undergo "sudden" menopause.

The traditional changes we think of as "menopause" happen when the ovaries no longer produce high levels of hormones. The ovaries are the reproductive glands that store eggs and release them into the fallopian tubes.

They also produce the female hormones estrogen and progesterone as well as testosterone. Together, estrogen and progesterone control menstruation. Estrogen also influences how the body uses calcium and maintains cholesterol levels in the blood.

You may be transitioning into menopause if you begin experiencing some or all of the following symptoms:

Hot flashes

According to conventional medical wisdom, menopause-related hot flashes fade away after six to 24 months. Not so, says a new study of women going through menopause. Hot flashes and night sweats last, on average, for about seven years and may go on for 11 years or more.

The hormonal roller coaster that comes with the end of a woman’s childbearing years can trigger a range of symptoms. Up to 80% of women going through menopause experience hot flashes. Hot flashes, also known as vasomotor symptoms, are often described as a sudden sensation of heat in the chest, face, and head followed by flushing, perspiration, and sometimes chills. When a hot flash occurs during sleep, it can be accompanied by a drenching sweat. Such night sweats make it difficult to get a good night’s rest.

None of these three types were found to be related to menopause in clinical trials. But many women do experience mood swings during perimenopause. Happy highs that turn into teary-eyed lows. Cheerful times followed by crabby days. It’s thought that these mood swings are related to the fluctuating levels of ovarian hormones during this transition to menopause. Plus, if a woman is not sleeping well due to night sweats, her mood would no doubt be affected, too.

Sleeping problem

When you’re making your journey through menopause, sleeping through the night may seem like an impossible dream. Insomnia and sleep disturbances caused by hot flashes leave many menopausal women tossing and turning or waking up drenched in sweat. The next day, irritability, anxiousness, fatigue, and trouble concentrating are common. If menopause symptoms continually keep you up at night, make an appointment to see your doctor. And in the meantime, try these lifestyle changes and smart sleep strategies to rest easy.

Depression

According to conventional medical wisdom, menopause-related hot flashes fade away after six to 24 months. Not so, says a new study of women going through menopause. Hot flashes and night sweats last, on average, for about seven years and may go on for 11 years or more.

The hormonal roller coaster that comes with the end of a woman’s childbearing years can trigger a range of symptoms. Up to 80% of women going through menopause experience hot flashes. Hot flashes, also known as vasomotor symptoms, are often described as a sudden sensation of heat in the chest, face, and head followed by flushing, perspiration, and sometimes chills. When a hot flash occurs during sleep, it can be accompanied by a drenching sweat. Such night sweats make it difficult to get a good night’s rest.

Mood swings

Mood swings are rapid and often extreme, fluctuations in one's emotional state, involving alternating between feelings of happiness and well-being and feelings of anger, irritability, or depression.
Among the possible causes of mood swings is an imbalance in the brain chemicals associated with mood regulation, as in the case of bipolar disorder, and the hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle or menopause.

Memory loss/problems

Whether you are just starting menopause or are smack in the middle of it, you may feel like you’re walking around in a brain fog. Memory loss is a common complaint among women at this time, says Pauline Maki, PhD, professor of psychiatry and psychology and director of women’s health research at the University of Illinois in Chicago. In fact studies show that some 60 percent of women in perimenopause and menopause report that their memory is not as good as it used to be.

Maki says that many women with menopause-related brain fog tend to forget recently learned verbal information and have trouble concentrating. Common complaints include drawing a blank on the names of people you just met at a cocktail party or forgetting what you walked into a room to do.

Some women become very frightened, believing they are developing dementia, Maki says. However, in 2009, researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, found that in the more than 2,000 women studied over four years, memory and learning ability tended to return after menopause was complete.

Vascular issues

"The menopausal transition is a vulnerable time for women in terms of vascular health," said the study's lead author Kerry Hildreth, MD, assistant professor in the Division of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. "Many women also experience menopausal symptoms that can negatively affect their quality of life and can contribute to depression, which is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease

Researchers- Hildreth and her colleagues studied 138 healthy women grouped according to the stage of menopause. They found that arteries were stiffer, and the endothelium, the layer of cells that line the blood vessels, was progressively less healthy across the stages of menopause.

Women entering menopause experience profound hormonal changes coinciding with adverse changes in cardiovascular disease risk factors like high blood pressure, weight gain and insulin resistance, the study said. This may help explain the acceleration of vascular aging during the menopause transition.

Headache

Migraine headaches are painful and can put your life on hold for several hours or days. They’re often connected to fluctuations in estrogen—and women make up 70% of the 28 million Americans who suffer from migraines.

Every woman is different so menopause can affect your migraines in a number of ways. Menopause may make migraines less severe if they were linked to the hormonal fluctuations of your menstrual cycle. Or migraines may start for the first time, or worsen, around perimenopause because of new hormonal fluctuations. Hormone therapy for menopausal symptoms may also be linked to migraines at this time. The good news is that hormonal migraines usually stop after menopause, when hormone levels are consistently low.

Stress

During menopause stage, when estrogen and progesterone are often out of balance, your adrenal glands, pituitary glands, and hypothalamus release hormones that too can become out of balance. This, added to increased cortisol and other stress hormones such as adrenaline, can turn an already stressful situation into something much worse.

Hormone imbalance is often a self-perpetuating cycle that can create physical, emotional, and psychological stress. Stress feeds the imbalance in your body, and normal day-to-day stressors become bigger than they are. This in turn stresses you out even more, and so the cycle begins. Essentially, stress breeds stress, stress causes hormone imbalance, and hormone imbalance breeds hormone imbalance.

Low Libido

Although not directly related to menopause, the age-related decrease in testosterone may reduce desire in midlife women, as this hormone plays a role in women’s sex drive and sexual sensation. The precise role of testosterone in desire is complex, however, because low sexual desire in women has not been shown to be related to testosterone levels in scientific studies. Also, some women who undergo an abrupt menopause (caused by removal of both ovaries or by chemotherapy), which leads to an immediate drop in both estrogen and testosterone, suffer a greater reduction in desire than women who experience natural menopause. Interestingly, other women in the same situation do not have a decrease in desire.

The earlier you make sure these foods are staples in your menopause diet, the easier menopause and the years beyond may be.

Here are listed below:

-drink plenty of water

-consume more on foods rich in calcium like milk and nonfat yougart

-rich in vitamin D and Iron

-fruits and vegetables

-whole grains

-flaxseeds

-low colories foods in general

You should avoid:

-Steer clear of alcohol, sugar, caffeine, and spicy foods.

Note: If there is any symptoms mentioned above that gets severe, immediately check your doctor and ask for any assistance
SOURCES: BrightSide
Menopause Signs It's Better to Know About While You're Young Menopause Signs It's Better to Know About While You're Young Reviewed by LVS Staff on September 18, 2018 Rating: 5
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